Is Ginger compatible with breastfeeding? Do we have alternatives for Ginger?

Ginger

March 21, 2018 (Very Low Risk)

The root of this herb is used.
It contains oleoresin and essential oil along with sesquiterpene hydrocarbons, and spicy substances (gingeroles and shogaols).
Attributed properties: digestive, carminative, antiemetic and anti-inflammatory.
Indications according to Commission E of the German Ministry of Health: motion sickness, vomiting (pregnancy, post surgery), anorexia, dyspepsia.

Plant widely used in many countries as a condiment and as a medicine. In some cultures its consumption increases during pregnancy or lactation without reported complications (Nordeng 2004, Chen 2013, Kennedy 2013). It is used as a galactogogue by cultures from several continents (Raven 2007, Lamxay 2011, Sim 2103).

A study with few participants shown an increase of milk production within the first 6 days postpartum but not later; there was no change on prolactin levels (Paritakul 2016).

The best galactogogue result is achieved by a frequent on demand suckling and using a correct technique (ABM Protocol No. 9 2011).

It may be considered compatible with breastfeeding (Dennehy 2011)
Abuse may be a cause of clotting issues (bleeding) and heartburn.

Alternatives

We do not have alternatives for Ginger since it is relatively safe.

Very Low Risk

Compatible. Not risky for breastfeeding or infant.

Low Risk

Moderately safe. Mild risk possible. Follow up recommended. Read the Comment.

High Risk

Poorly safe. Evaluate carefully. Use a safer alternative. Read the Comment.

Very High Risk

Not recommended. Cessation of breastfeeding or alternative.

Synonyms

  • Gan Jiang

Writings

  • Zingiber officinale (Latin, botanical name)
  • Τζίντζερ (Greek)
  • Имбирь (Cyrillic)
  • ショウキョウ (Japanese)

References

  1. Paritakul P, Ruangrongmorakot K, Laosooksathit W, Suksamarnwong M, Puapornpong P. The Effect of Ginger on Breast Milk Volume in the Early Postpartum Period: A Randomized, Double-Blind Controlled Trial. Breastfeed Med. 2016Abstract
  2. Chen LW, Low YL, Fok D, Han WM, Chong YS, Gluckman P, Godfrey K, Kwek K, Saw SM, Soh SE, Tan KH, Chong MF, van Dam RM. Dietary changes during pregnancy and the postpartum period in Singaporean Chinese, Malay and Indian women: the GUSTO birth cohort study. Public Health Nutr. 2014Abstract
  3. Chen LW, Low YL, Fok D, Han WM, Chong YS, Gluckman P, Godfrey K, Kwek K, Saw SM, Soh SE, Tan KH, Chong MF, van Dam RM. Dietary changes during pregnancy and the postpartum period in Singaporean Chinese, Malay and Indian women: the GUSTO birth cohort study. Public Health Nutr. 2013Abstract
  4. Kennedy DA, Lupattelli A, Koren G, Nordeng H. Herbal medicine use in pregnancy: results of a multinational study. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2013Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  5. The Royal Women’s Hospital Victoria Australia. Herbal and Traditional Medicines in Breasfeeding. Fact Sheet. 2013 Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  6. Sim TF, Sherriff J, Hattingh HL, Parsons R, Tee LB. The use of herbal medicines during breastfeeding: a population-based survey in Western Australia. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2013Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  7. Dennehy C. Omega-3 fatty acids and ginger in maternal health: pharmacology, efficacy, and safety. J Midwifery Womens Health. 2011Abstract
  8. Lamxay V, de Boer HJ, Björk L. Traditions and plant use during pregnancy, childbirth and postpartum recovery by the Kry ethnic group in Lao PDR. J Ethnobiol Ethnomed. 2011Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  9. ABM. Comité de Protocolos de la Academia Médica de Lactancia Materna. ABM Protocolo Clínico #9: Uso de Galactogogos para Iniciar o aumentar la tasa de secreción de Leche Materna. Breastfeed Med. 2011 Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  10. ABM. Academy Of Breastfeeding Medicine Protocol Committee. ABM Clinical Protocol #9: Use of galactogogues in initiating or augmenting the rate of maternal milk secretion (First Revision January 2011). Breastfeed Med. 2011Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  11. Ozgoli G, Goli M, Simbar M. Effects of ginger capsules on pregnancy, nausea, and vomiting. J Altern Complement Med. 2009Abstract
  12. Raven JH, Chen Q, Tolhurst RJ, Garner P. Traditional beliefs and practices in the postpartum period in Fujian Province, China: a qualitative study. BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2007Abstract
  13. Borrelli F, Capasso R, Aviello G, Pittler MH, Izzo AA. Effectiveness and safety of ginger in the treatment of pregnancy-induced nausea and vomiting. Obstet Gynecol. 2005Abstract
  14. Boone SA, Shields KM. Treating pregnancy-related nausea and vomiting with ginger. Ann Pharmacother. 2005Abstract
  15. Nordeng H, Havnen GC. Use of herbal drugs in pregnancy: a survey among 400 Norwegian women. Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2004Abstract
  16. Westfall RE. Use of anti-emetic herbs in pregnancy: women's choices, and the question of safety and efficacy. Complement Ther Nurs Midwifery. 2004Abstract
  17. WHO. World Health Organization. Geneva. WHO monographs on selected medicinal plants. Volume I. WHO monographs 1999 Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  18. O'Hara M, Kiefer D, Farrell K, Kemper K. A review of 12 commonly used medicinal herbs. Arch Fam Med. 1998Abstract