Is Hypo-Caloric Diet compatible with breastfeeding? Do we have alternatives for Hypo-Caloric Diet?

Hypo-Caloric Diet

February 20, 2016 (Very Low Risk)

Despite of a deficient diet with inadequate nutrient intake, women are capable of producing milk in appropriate quantity and quality that may be enough to maintain growth and health of their children. However, it would suppose a risk for depletion of their nutritional reserves and damaging their health.
Moreover, well-nourished mothers compared to malnourished, they have a greater daily volume of milk and a slight increase in protein, fat and calories per 100 ml of milk, so the chance of raising a healthy child is higher.

There is controversy on whether postpartum weight loss is greater or the return to pre-pregnancy weight is faster in lactating mothers than in non-lactating mothers.
Many nursing women lose half a kg per month during the first months, but some do not lose or even gain weight.

Slow weight loss (less than 1.5 kg per month) through a balanced diet with at least 1800 calories or no less than 15% of the recommended one together with moderate aerobic exercising is safe for the mother and the infant.
Prolactin levels increase under conditions of negative energy balance, which ensures the production of milk and hence protects the infant’s nutrition.

It is unknown whether a low calorie diet may affect milk production during the first three postnatal weeks, so any kind of diet over this period is not warranted.

Very Low Risk

Compatible. Not risky for breastfeeding or infant.

Low Risk

Moderately safe. Mild risk possible. Follow up recommended. Read the Comment.

High Risk

Poorly safe. Evaluate carefully. Use a safer alternative. Read the Comment.

Very High Risk

Not recommended. Cessation of breastfeeding or alternative.

Synonyms

  • Caloric Restriction
  • Diet
  • Weightloss
  • Weight loss

References

  1. Amorim Adegboye AR, Linne YM. Diet or exercise, or both, for weight reduction in women after childbirth. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  2. Mohammad MA, Sunehag AL, Haymond MW. Effect of dietary macronutrient composition under moderate hypocaloric intake on maternal adaptation during lactation. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  3. Gambineri A, Patton L, Vaccina A, Cacciari M, Morselli-Labate AM, Cavazza C, Pagotto U, Pasquali R. Treatment with flutamide, metformin, and their combination added to a hypocaloric diet in overweight-obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a randomized, 12-month, placebo-controlled study. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2006Abstract
  4. Butte NF, King JC. Energy requirements during pregnancy and lactation. Public Health Nutr. 2005Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  5. Dewey KG, Cohen RJ, Brown KH, Rivera LL. Effects of exclusive breastfeeding for four versus six months on maternal nutritional status and infant motor development: results of two randomized trials in Honduras. J Nutr. 2001Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  6. Gigante DP, Victora CG, Barros FC. Breast-feeding has a limited long-term effect on anthropometry and body composition of Brazilian mothers. J Nutr. 2001Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  7. Haiek LN, Kramer MS, Ciampi A, Tirado R. Postpartum weight loss and infant feeding. J Am Board Fam Pract. 2001Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  8. Motil KJ, Sheng HP, Kertz BL, Montandon CM, Ellis KJ. Lean body mass of well-nourished women is preserved during lactation. Am J Clin Nutr. 1998Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  9. Butte NF, Garza C, Stuff JE, Smith EO, Nichols BL. Effect of maternal diet and body composition on lactational performance. Am J Clin Nutr. 1984Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  10. Paul AA, Muller EM, Whitehead RG. The quantitative effects of maternal dietary energy intake on pregnancy and lactation in rural Gambian women. Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg. 1979Abstract