Is Nystatin compatible with breastfeeding? Do we have alternatives for Nystatin?

Nystatin

February 20, 2015 (Very Low Risk)

At latest update, relevant published data on excretion into breast milk were not found.

Absorption through the skin and mucosa is nil, in addition it is known to be almost nil via gastrointestinal tract. Hence, it is unlikely its appearance in the mother's plasma or the milk.

Authorized medication for use in small infants and newborns.

It is recommended to avoid putting creams, gels and other products for local use that could contain paraffin (mineral oil) on the nipple, in order to keep from absorbing it by the child.

WHO Model List of Essential Medicines (2002): compatible with breastfeeding.

Alternatives

We do not have alternatives for Nystatin since it is relatively safe.

Very Low Risk

Compatible. Not risky for breastfeeding or infant.

Low Risk

Moderately safe. Mild risk possible. Follow up recommended. Read the Comment.

High Risk

Poorly safe. Evaluate carefully. Use a safer alternative. Read the Comment.

Very High Risk

Not recommended. Cessation of breastfeeding or alternative.

Synonyms

  • ナイスタチン
  • Fungicidin
  • Nystatin Gel
  • Nystatin Vaginal Ovules
  • نيستاتين
  • νυστατίνη
  • Нистатин
  • 制霉菌素

References

  1. Butler DC, Heller MM, Murase JE. Safety of dermatologic medications in pregnancy and lactation: Part II. Lactation. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2014Abstract
  2. Kiat-Amnuay S, Bouquot J. Breastfeeding keratosis: this frictional keratosis of newborns may mimic thrush. Pediatrics. 2013Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  3. Amir LH, Pirotta MV, Raval M. Breastfeeding--evidence based guidelines for the use of medicines. Aust Fam Physician. 2011Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  4. Hoeger PH, Stark S, Jost G. Efficacy and safety of two different antifungal pastes in infants with diaper dermatitis: a randomized, controlled study. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2010Abstract
  5. Concin N, Hofstetter G, Plattner B, Tomovski C, Fiselier K, Gerritzen K, Fessler S, Windbichler G, Zeimet A, Ulmer H, Siegl H, Rieger K, Concin H, Grob K. Mineral oil paraffins in human body fat and milk. Food Chem Toxicol. 2008Abstract
  6. Nystatin. Drug Summary. 2006 Full text (in our servers)
  7. Ilett KF, Kristensen JH. Drug use and breastfeeding. Expert Opin Drug Saf. 2005Abstract
  8. de Vries TW, Wewerinke ME, de Langen JJ. [Near asphyxiation of a neonate due to miconazole oral gel]. Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 2004Abstract
  9. Nistatina. Ficha técnica. 2004 Full text (in our servers)
  10. Noti A, Grob K, Biedermann M, Deiss U, Brüschweiler BJ. Exposure of babies to C15-C45 mineral paraffins from human milk and breast salves. Regul Toxicol Pharmacol. 2003Abstract
  11. WHO / UNICEF. BREASTFEEDING AND MATERNAL MEDICATION Recommendations for Drugs in the Eleventh WHO Model List of Essential Drugs. Department of Child and Adolescent Health and Development (WHO/UNICEF) 2002 Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  12. Mactal-Haaf C, Hoffman M, Kuchta A. Use of anti-infective agents during lactation, Part 3: Antivirals, antifungals, and urinary antiseptics. J Hum Lact. 2001Abstract
  13. Brent NB. Thrush in the breastfeeding dyad: results of a survey on diagnosis and treatment. Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2001Abstract
  14. Hoover K. Breast pain during lactation that resolved with fluconazole: two case studies. J Hum Lact. 1999Abstract
  15. Bodley V, Powers D. Long-term treatment of a breastfeeding mother with fluconazole-resolved nipple pain caused by yeast: a case study. J Hum Lact. 1997Abstract
  16. Dhondt F, Ninane J, De Beule K, Dhondt A, Cauwenbergh G. Oral candidosis: treatment with absorbable and non-absorbable antifungal agents in children. Mycoses. 1992Abstract