Is Chia compatible with breastfeeding? Do we have alternatives for Chia?

Chia

July 11, 2017 (Very Low Risk)

Salvia hispanica also called chia is one of the 900 species that forms part of the genus Salvia which also pertains Salvia officinalis or Common Salvia (see specific info), whose composition, properties and uses are totally different.
This comment refers exclusively to Salvia hispanica or chia.

It is consumed as food through the use of seeds (ground seeds, whole seeds or oil) of the herb which is native from Mexico and Central America.
Devoid of toxicity it was along with corn and beans, the staple of pre-Columbian Central American populations.

It has a high fiber content (34 g), fat (28 g), carbohydrates (9 g) and protein (20 g). Its energy value is 430 calories per 100 g (Jiménez 2013).
It is a plant with a higher content of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), which is the precursor of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), essential for the development of brain and visual functions (Valenzuela 2015).

Consuming chia oil, containing 60% ALA increases the levels of DHA in breast milk, which can be useful in populations with low fish consumption (Valenzuela 2015).

Still unproven its effectiveness in preventing or treating cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity or overweight (Ulbricht 2009, Nieman 2009, de Souza 2015).


See below the information of this related product:
  • Sage (Low Risk probable)
Very Low Risk

Compatible. Not risky for breastfeeding or infant.

Low Risk

Moderately safe. Mild risk possible. Follow up recommended. Read the Comment.

High Risk

Poorly safe. Evaluate carefully. Use a safer alternative. Read the Comment.

Very High Risk

Not recommended. Cessation of breastfeeding or alternative.

Synonyms

  • Salvia chia (Latin, botanical name)
  • Salvia hispanica (Latin, botanical name)

References

  1. Valenzuela R, Bascuñán K, Chamorro R, Barrera C, Sandoval J, Puigrredon C, Parraguez G, Orellana P, Gonzalez V, Valenzuela A. Modification of Docosahexaenoic Acid Composition of Milk from Nursing Women Who Received Alpha Linolenic Acid from Chia Oil during Gestation and Nursing. Nutrients. 2015Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  2. de Souza Ferreira C, dd Sousa Fomes Lde F, da Silva GE, Rosa G. Effect of chia seed (Salvia hispanica L.) consumption on cardiovascular risk factors in humans: a systematic review. Nutr Hosp. 2015Abstract
  3. de Souza Ferreira C, dd Sousa Fomes Lde F, da Silva GE, Rosa G. EFFECT OF CHIA SEED (SALVIA HISPANICA L.) CONSUMPTION ON CARDIOVASCULAR RISK FACTORS IN HUMANS: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW. Nutr Hosp. 2015Abstract
  4. Paula Jiménez P, Lilia Masson S, Vilma Quitral R. Composición química de semillas de chía, linaza y rosa mosqueta y su aporte en ácidos grasos omega-3. [Chemical composition of chia seed, flaxseed and rosehip and its contribution in fatty acids omega-3]. Rev Chil Nutr Vol. 40, Nº2 2013Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  5. Mohd Ali N, Yeap SK, Ho WY, Beh BK, Tan SW, Tan SG. The promising future of chia, Salvia hispanica L. J Biomed Biotechnol. 2012Abstract
  6. Nieman DC, Cayea EJ, Austin MD, Henson DA, McAnulty SR, Jin F. Chia seed does not promote weight loss or alter disease risk factors in overweight adults. Nutr Res. 2009Abstract
  7. Ulbricht C, Chao W, Nummy K, Rusie E, Tanguay-Colucci S, Iannuzzi CM, Plammoottil JB, Varghese M, Weissner W. Chia (Salvia hispanica): a systematic review by the natural standard research collaboration. Rev Recent Clin Trials. 2009Abstract