Is Collagen compatible with breastfeeding? Do we have alternatives for Collagen?

Collagen

January 29, 2017 (Very Low Risk)

A fibrous-protein type which is a component of the mammalian connective tissue forming the attachment fibers of all tissues in the organism (bone, cartilage, tendons, skin, muscles, etc.). It represents one-third of total body's protein content and is composed by amino acids.

Collagen has a great variety of medical, surgical, nutritional and industrial uses such as grafts, sutures, hemostatic products, subcutaneous implants and fillers, pill and capsule covering, glue and cement manufacturing, parts of musical instrument, cosmetic gels, food, photographic and pharmaceutical industry.

Collagen, because of its fibrous nature, is very difficult to chew and digest. To be used as a food it needs to be boiled and treated with various chemicals that break down the bonds and convert it into the so-called hydrolyzed, denatured collagen or gelatin, which is marketed as powder or tablets for various medicinal or health uses like arthritis, joint pains, weight loosing, anti-aging, strengthening of the hair or nails, improvement of the physical fitness and so on, all of them without any serious scientific basis that would guarantee effectiveness (EFSA 2011, EFSA 2013, MedlinePlus Supplements 2015, Revenga 2015).

Because of a protein nature it is digested by the gastrointestinal tract and absorbed itself as a form of amino acids as those of any other meat.

Collagen as a supplement is not necessary at all whenever a healthy and balanced diet is followed.

Very Low Risk

Compatible. Not risky for breastfeeding or infant.

Low Risk

Moderately safe. Mild risk possible. Follow up recommended. Read the Comment.

High Risk

Poorly safe. Evaluate carefully. Use a safer alternative. Read the Comment.

Very High Risk

Not recommended. Cessation of breastfeeding or alternative.

Synonyms

  • Collagen Hydrolysate
  • Collagen Hydrolysate
  • Gelatin
  • Hydrolyzed collagen
  • type 1 bovine collagen

Writings

  • Κολλαγόνο (Greek)
  • Желатин (Cyrillic)
  • Коллаген (Cyrillic)
  • ゼラチン (Japanese)

References

  1. National Institutes of Health / U.S. National Library of Medicine. Gelatin. MedlinePlus Supplements. 2015 Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  2. Institutos Nacionales de la Salud / Biblioteca Nacional de Medicina de los EE. UU. Gelatina. MedlinePlus Supplements. 2015 Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  3. Juan Revenga. Diga coláge-no (o la tontería de los suplementos de este tipo). El nutricionista de la general. 2015 Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  4. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA). Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to VeriSol®P and a change in skin elasticity leading to an improvement in skin function pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006. EFSA Journal 2013;11(6):3257. 2013 Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  5. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA). Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to collagen hydrolysate and maintenance of joints pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006 EFSA Journal 2011;9(7):2291. 2011 Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)